Archives for 

Somalia ሶማሊያ

Eritrea scored 1st in the worst freedom of press since 2007, 179 out of 179, Ethiopia stood 137 out of 179 in 2013 while Netherlands the best press freedom country

May 3 marked the twentieth anniversary of UNESCO’s World Press Freedom Day. A day to celebrate press freedom around the world. Or the lack of it. Reporters Without Borders has released its annual report on world press freedom in 2013, which documents overall trends and has a region-by-region breakdown of key issues and developments. This year already, nineteen journalists have been killed and 174 imprisoned, and 9  citizen journalists have been killed and 162 imprisoned.

The Press Freedom Index compiled by Reporters Without Borders “reflects the degree of freedom that journalists, news organizations and netizens enjoy in each country, and the efforts made by the authorities to respect and ensure respect for this freedom.”

According to Reporters Without Borders, following the Arab uprisings and “other protest movements that prompted many rises and falls in last year’s index [the] ranking of most countries is no longer attributable to dramatic political developments. This year’s index is a better reflection of the attitudes and intentions of governments towards media freedom in the medium or long term.”

Finland, the Netherlands, Norway, Luxembourg, and Andorra are ranked as the countries that most respect media freedom, while Eritrea, North Korea, Turkmenistan, Syria, and Somalia are the countries that least respect it.

 

Abdullah ibn Abdulaziz Al-Saud - Saudi ArabiaAlexander Lukashenko - BelarusAyatollah Ali Khamenei - IranBaloch armed groups - PakistanBashar Al-Assad - SyriaCamorra (Naples), 'Ndrangheta (Calabria), Sacra Corona Unita (Puglia), Cosa Nostra (Sicily) - ItalyChina – Xi Jinping - ChinaChoummaly Sayasone - LaosGurbanguly Berdymukhammedov - TurkmenistanIlham Aliyev - AzerbaijanIslam Karimov – President, Uzbekistan - UzbekistanIsrael Defence Forces - UzbekistanIssaias Afeworki - EritreaJabhat Al-Nosra - SyriaKim Jong-un - North KoreaKing Hamad Ben Aissa Al Khalifa - BahrainLeaders and members of extremist religious groups - MaldivesMahmoud Ahmadinejad - MaldivesMexico : Miguel Trevino Morales, alias Z-40, and the Zetas drug cartel - MexicoMiguel Facussé Barjum - HondurasMullah Mohammad Omar - PakistanNguyen Phu Trong - VietnamNursultan Nazarbayev - KazakhstanPaul Kagame - RwandaPhilippines: private militias - PhilippinesRamzan Kadyrov - RussiaRaúl Castro - CubaSomalia - Al-Shabaab, Islamist militia - CubaSwaziland - Mswati III, King - SwazilandTeodoro Obiang Nguema - Equatorial GuineaThe intelligence services - PakistanThe Islamist group Boko Haram - NigeriaThe Rajapakse brothers - Sri LankaThe ruling Muslim Brotherhood - Sri LankaVasif Yusif Oghlu Talibov - AzerbaijanVladimir Putin - RussiaYahya Jammeh - GambiaZimbabwe - Robert Mugabe, president - Zimbabwe“Otoniel” and Los Urabeños – paramilitaries - Colombia

 

 

 

EAST AFRICA STAGNATES NEAR BOTTOM OF THE INDEX, MALI NOSEDIVES

East Africa: journalists’ graveyard

In Somalia (175th, -11) 18 journalists were killed, caught up in bomb attacks or the direct targets of murder, making 2012 the deadliest in history for the country’s media. The Horn of Africa state was the second most dangerous country in the world for those working in news and information, behind Syria.

In Eritrea (in last place in the index for the sixth successive year), no journalists were killed but some were left to die, which amounts to the same thing. With at least 30 behind bars, it is Africa’s biggest prison for journalists. Of 11 incarcerated since 2001, 7 have died as a result of prison conditions or have killed themselves. Since the independent media were abolished more than 10 years ago, there are no independent Eritrean news outlets, other than outside the country, and terror prevails.

East Africa is also a region of censorship and crackdowns. Omar al-Bashir’s Sudan, where more newspapers were seized and the arrests of journalists continued during the summer, is stuck firmly in 170th place, in the bottom 10 of the index.

Djibouti (167th, -8), which has no independent media, detained a correspondent of the foreign-based news site La Voix de Djibouti. Despite the release of two Swedish journalists arrested in 2011, Ethiopia (137th) fell ten places because of its repressive application of the 2009 anti-terrorist law and the continued detention of several local journalists.

Political unrest in Mali and the Central African Republic

Mali (99th, -74), which was long presented as the continent’s star performer in democracy and press freedom, was prey to the political events that overtook it during the year. The military coup in Bamako on 22 March and the seizure of the north of the country by Touareg separatists and Islamic fundamentalists exposed news organizations to censorship and abuses. Many northern radio stations stopped broadcasting, while in the capital several Malian and foreign journalists were assaulted. All these occurred before the external military intervention in January 2013.

The Central African Republic was ranked 65th in 2012. Events after the outbreak of the Seleka rebellion at the very end of the year (radio stations ransacked, one journalist killed) were not taken into consideration in this index, thus preventing the country from falling more than 50 places. These will be included in the 2014 version. In Guinea-Bissau (92nd, -17) a media blackout and military censorship that followed the coup on 12 April explain that country’s drop.

Africa’s predatory censors

Yahya Jammeh, King Mswati III, Paul Kagame, and Teodoro Obiang Nguema, together with other heads of state such as Issaias Afeworki (Eritrea) and Ismael Omar Guelleh (Djibouti) are members of an exclusive club of authoritarian African leaders, some eccentric others stern, who hold their countries in an iron grasp and keep a firm grip on news and information. Their countries, respectively Gambia (152nd), Swaziland(155th), Rwanda (161st) and Equatorial Guinea (166th), are all among the bottom 30 in the index. Media pluralism has been whittled away and criticism of the head of state discouraged.

The biggest losses

Chad (121st, -18) saw journalists harassed and roughed up, the publication of the newspaper N’Djamena Bi-Hebdo temporarily halted and its publisher sentenced to a suspended prison term, and a highly repressive bill kept under wraps. The slow but sure progress that followed the formation of a national unity government in Zimbabwe (133rd, -16) in 2009 and the granting of publication licences to several independent newspapers appeared to have stalled. Violence and arrests of journalists still niggle and if elections go ahead as planned in 2013, the atmosphere for the media promises to be tense. Relatively high placed in 2011-2012,South Sudan (124th) fell 12 places after the murder of a columnist – the first killing of its kind in the new country – as news organizations and journalists awaited the approval of three new laws on the media.

Despite the holding of a national media conference in Cameroon (120th, -23), the future of the sector remains both uncertain and worrying. In the upper reaches of the index, Niger (43rd) nonetheless fell 14 places as a result of the irresponsibility of a few journalists who succumbed to the temptation to abuse the freedom that they enjoyed. Within the space of four months in Tanzania (70th, -36), one journalist was killed while he was covering a demonstration and another was found dead, a clear victim of murder.

Burundi (132nd) fell only two places but remains a low position. Summonses of journalists declined but the case of Hassan Ruvakuki, given a life sentence reduced to three years on appeal, has created an atmosphere of fear among the media.

Return to normality

After a dreadful year in 2011, marked by the dictatorial behaviour of the late President Bingu Wa Mutharika, a violent crackdown on demonstrations and the murder of the blogger Robert Chasowa, Malawi (75th) recorded the biggest jump in the entire index, up 71 places, close to the position it held in 2010. Similarly,Ivoiry Coast rose 63 places to 96th despite persistent problems. It had plummeted in the previous index because of a post-election crisis and the murders of a journalist and another media worker, as well as the civil conflict that broke out in Abidjan in April. Uganda (104th) was up 35 places thanks to a better year, but things were far from satisfactory as far as the media were concerned. The year ended with President Yoweri Museveni making open threats to several radio stations.

Promising gains

For Senegal (59th, +16), 2012 was a year of hope. The presidential election took place in a peaceful atmosphere for the media, despite a few regrettable assaults on journalists, and President Macky Sall, who had declared himself willing to decriminalize press offences, took office. Much remains to be proved in 2013, as was illustrated by the prison sentence handed down on a journalist in December.

In Liberia (97th, +13), the presidential election in November 2011 had been tainted by the closure of several media outlets and attacks on journalists. In 2012, the atmosphere improved greatly. In the summer, President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf became the second African head of state, after Mahamadou Issoufou ofNiger, to sign the Declaration of Table Mountain, thereby undertaking to promote media freedom.

Namibia (19th), Cape Verde (25th) and Ghana (30th) maintained their record as the highest ranked African countries

ETHIOPIA

Reporters Without Borders hails Swedish journalists’ release

The Ethiopian government has released reporter Martin Schibbye and photographer Johan Persson, who spent 14 months in prison on convictions for (…)

Published on 10 September 2012 Read

ETHIOPIA

Columnist’s sentence on terrorism charges cut from 14 to 5 years

Ethiopia’s federal supreme court reduced columnist Reyot Alemu’s jail sentence from 14 to five years in prison on 3 August after overturning her (…)

Published on 8 August 2012 Read

ETHIOPIA

Although still at draft stage, new telecoms rules give cause for concern

Reporters Without Borders wishes to correct a report published on its website on 7 June stating that the 2012 Proclamation on Telecom Fraud (…)

Published on 6 July 2012 Read

ETHIOPIA

Government steps up control of news and information

Ethiopia’s only ISP, state-owned Ethio-Telecom, has just installed a system for blocking access to the Tor network, which lets users browse (…)

Published on 7 June 2012 Read

ETHIOPIA

Leading weekly’s website blocked for past six days

Reporters Without Borders is very worried to learn that access to the Amharic website of Ethiopia’s leading independent, privately-owned weekly, (…)

Published on 26 April 2012 Read

ETHIOPIA

“Journalists are not terrorists”

Reporters Without Borders has just visited Ethiopia, where two Swedish journalists, Kontinent news agency reporter Martin Schibbye and (…)

Published on 24 January 2012 Read

ETHIOPIA

Two journalists sentenced to 14 years on terrorism charges

A week after being found guilty of participating in a terrorist organization and preparing a terrorist attack, the Ethiopian journalists Reyot (…)

Published on 24 January 2012 Read

ETHIOPIA

Two Swedish journalists sentenced to 11 years in prison

Johan Persson and Martin Schibbye, the two Swedish journalists who were convicted by an Addis Ababa court on 21 December on charges of entering (…)

———————————

Eritrea

Back on the air

Published on 18 February 2013Read

ERITREA

What really happened at Asmara’s ministry of (dis)information ?

The Eritrean capital, Asmara, saw an uprising on 21 January that was both unexpected and short-lived. Around 100 soldiers staged a mutiny and (…)

Published on 24 January 2013 Read

ERITREA

Complaint filed in Paris about jamming of Radio Erena

Reporters Without Borders filed a complaint with the public prosecutor in Paris on 6 November accusing persons unknown of acts of piracy against (…)

Published on 8 November 2012 Read

ERITREA

Three jurists refer imprisoned journalist’s case to African human rights panel

Three European jurists referred the case of the imprisoned Swedish-Eritrean journalist Dawit Isaac to the African Commission on Human and (…)

Published on 29 October 2012 Read

ERITREA

Eritrea’s exile journalists appeal to international community

The Association of Eritrean Journalists in Exile (AEJE), a Reporters Without Borders partner organization, issued a press release on 18 September (…)

Published on 20 September 2012 Read

ERITREA

RWB-backed satellite radio station sabotaged again

Radio Erena, a Paris-based satellite radio station that broadcasts to Eritreans in Eritrea and to the Eritrean diaspora, is again the target of a (…)

Published on 6 September 2012 Read

ERITREA

Pirate transmission silences sole independent news outlet for three weeks

Radio Erena (Our Eritrea), a Paris-based radio station that broadcasts to Eritrea, one of the world’s most closed countries, and to the Eritrean (…)

Published on 3 September 2012 Read

ERITREA

Three journalists held since 2001 die in Eiraeiro prison camp

After several weeks of investigating reports from sources in Eritrea and from prison guards who fled the country, Reporters Without Borders has (…)

Published on 30 August 2012 Read

ERITREA

Detained Eritrean journalist admitted to hospital in serious condition

Reporters Without Borders has learned that the journalist Yirgalem Fisseha Mebrahtu, in custody since her arrest in February 2009, was admitted (…)

1. Eritrea

According to Reporters Without Borders, with at “least 30 behind bars [Eritrea] is Africa’s biggest prison for journalists.” Following a widespread government crackdown in 2001, there are no independent news outlets in Eritrea. Of the eleven journalists who were imprisoned in 2001, seven have already died in prison or killed themselves. The government, led by the Information Minister Ali Abdu, uses intimidation and imprisonment to maintain control information.

2. North Korea

The North Korean government exercises direct and total control over the media in the country, which is tasked with glorifying the state and its former leader Kim Il-sung. Although independent North Korean radio stations exist in South Korea, thousands “of North Koreans have been detained for listening to a foreign radio station, making phone calls abroad or publicly questioning the sole political party.”

North Korea is also one of the hardest countries for foreign journalists to cover, with access and freedom of movement severely restricted.

3. Turkmenistan

Similar to North Korea, local media in Turkmenistan is “under total state control.” According to Reporters Without Borders, journalists are required to “cover the president’s “achievements” and “good works,” radio and TV stations and newspapers are scolded when they fail to show enough fervour and deference towards him, and are subjected to arbitrary appointments and dismissals.”

While the internet may offer some hope for change, access is severely restricted and “independent journalists have to operate clandestinely and risk arbitrary detention or even torture.” Journalists Annakurban Amanklychev and Sapardurdy Khadzhiev, both held on fabricated charges, were only released earlier this year after seven years in prison.

4. Syria

While privately-owned media outlets have emerged in Syria, the state “has always maintained a stranglehold on news content,” through web censorship, harassment and abuse of journalists, media blackouts on dissent, and the arrest and expulsion of foreign reporters.

According to Reporters Without Borders, of all the countries on the list, Syria is the one which saw “most attacks on freedom of information.” It went on to say that reporters are being “targeted by all the parties to the conflict – the regular army and the various opposition factions – who are waging an information war.”

5. Somalia

 

Already this year four journalists have been killed in Somalia, adding to the eighteen killed last year. Journalists in the country operate under the constant threat of arbitrary arrest and detention, surviving, in the words of one Somali reporter, only by living in a “state of paranoia constantly assessing and reassessing your surroundings.” Not only is the number of targeted assassinations is alarming, but some journalists have “ended up in jail even without publishing or airing a report.”

As we reflect on the severe restrictions that journalists in the above countries face, we must also remain critical of the state of the media in countries that are so often held up as beacons of freedom. While obviously not on the same scale as what is happening in Eritrea or Somalia, things such as the hacking scandal in Britain and the arrest of journalists covering the Occupy movement in the U.S. should also give us pause for thought.

 

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

US Al-Amriki is on run from Alshabab and the US

Nairobi – An American extremist in Somalia is fighting former comrades in the al-Qaeda linked Shabaab insurgent group, in what he says may be his final stand, he writes.

Alabama-born Omar Hamami – better known as Al-Amriki or “the American” – once fought alongside the hardline Shabaab in Somalia, but last year fell out with the fighters who now want to kill him.

He is also wanted by the US government, who have placed a $5m bounty on his head and is listed on the FBI‘s Most Wanted Terrorists list.

“We were forced to fight in self defence and killed three and wounded others,” he wrote in a message on Twitter, posted late on Monday.

“May not find another chance to Tweet but just remember what we said and what we stood for. God kept me alive to deliver the message to the ummah [community].”

Hamami, 28, moved to Somalia in 2006 and began to work for Shabaab recruiting young trainees through his English-language rap songs and videos, but later split from the main wing of the Shabaab.

“They raided our houses and took our stuff, and said they found condoms, alcohol, and documents,” he added, writing from an undisclosed location in Somalia. “Their goal is to kill us regardless of reason.”

Last week he claimed a Shabaab gunmen tried to assassinate him while he was drinking tea in a cafe, posting a photograph of himself dripping with blood from where he said the pistol bullet grazed his throat.

“They are sending forces from multiple directions,” he wrote last week. “We are few but might get back up.”

Born in 1984 to a Syrian Muslim father and a white Protestant mother, Hamami was raised as a Christian but began to feel estranged from his upbringing as teenager before moving to Somalia.

“‘I’m on a mission from God’, minus the blues music”, he wrote last week, an apparent reference to the 1980 Blues Brothers film, an American musical comedy.

– AFP

Al Shabab says they have got newly recruited fighters. Hundreds of the newly recruited fighters, mostly masked young men were seen matching the road between Ambareeso village and Baraawe town.

Mogadishu (RBC) Militant fighters in Somalia, Al Shabab said they have got newly recruited fighters and that they will boost up their rebellion activities against Somali government and the African Union forces [AMISOM], Al Shabab commander said.

Hundreds of the newly recruited fighters, mostly masked young men were seen matching the road between Ambareeso village and Baraawe town, the only Al Shabab’s stronghold in Middle Shabelle region, 350 km south of Somalia capital..

Al Shabab’s Middle Shabelle region commander Mohamed abu Cabdalla who addressed the young fighters vowed they will destroy the bases of AMISOM and Somali government forces.

“You are the braves of the Mujahidin, your duty is to liberate the land of Muslims from the christian invaders.” abu Cabdalla told the young masked men holding AK-47, Rocket Propelled Grenades (RPGs), Mortars, Anti Aircraft guns.

 

Al Shabab says they have got newly recruited fighters. Hundreds of trained fighters were seen marching near Baraawe town.

A pro-Al Shabab cleric Sheikh Jama Abdisalam said the new fighters have shown their willingness to fight for the religion and to return back what he called as “Al Shabab’s lost power” in Somalia.

“We are waiting for you as we look how you are committed to regain the power of the Xarakah [group] in this land.” Sheikh Abdisalam said.

He also warned them to avoid internal conflict referring to the recent foiled kill attempt against Omar Hamammi, American-born Al Shabab member attacked by other Al Shabab rival group in Baay region of southern Somalia.  Hamammi posted pictures of showing his injured wounds and blamed the attack for Al Shabab leaders.

Hundreds of masked men holding AK47, RPGs and mortars marched the road that links between Ambareeso village and Baraawe town, 350 km south of Somalia capital.

Al Shabab’s Sunday maneuver in Baraawe town becomes the biggest military show up in southern Somalia since the group lost large swathes of land in southern Somalia following heavy military assault by the government forces backed by the African Union mission.

Hundreds of the newly recruited fighters, mostly masked young men were seen matching the road between Ambareeso village and Baraawe town, the only Al Shabab’s stronghold in Middle Shabelle region.

The show up came as Somalia government warned three weeks ago that the extremist group was gathering a lured teenagers to fight for them.

 

Al Shabab in Somalia shows military power after receiving newly recruited fighters.

 

Hundreds of the newly recruited fighters, mostly masked young men were seen matching the road between Ambareeso village and Baraawe town, the only Al Shabab’s stronghold in Middle Shabelle region, 350 km south of Somalia capital..

RBC Radio

Enhanced by Zemanta

Ethiopian Dictator U turn and decided to rest in Somalia while the northern clash with Eritrea continues in silence

The Ethiopian dictator made   u-turn and decided to prolong it stay in Somalia mongering war since the northern front with Eritrea seems is now no menace though a continues fire exchange is live  near Badme town from our reporter in the area .    And Somalia has been chaos since warlord’s toppled Dictator Mohamed Siad Barre in 1991. And since 1998 has been a continuation of the war between Eritrea and Ethiopia.

Big pretext given by the Melees Zenawie to keep its troops in Somalia – “until the Horn of Africa country ratifies a constitution and its military is able to fend off militant threats on its own. ”  Ethiopian forces captured the rebel stronghold of Baidoa in southern Somalia in February having seized Baladwayne from the militants and started evacuating when the conflict with Eritrea rekindled two weeks ago.

 

Melees  Zenawie the irredentist dictator join the scramble for Somalia by rolling hundreds of troops across its border in November by  opening  up a third front  against Shabab, the two  main underline    reasons are

– competition with Kenya for controlling the big portion of oil rich southern  Somalia,

–  and the fight with Eritrea since its ill-fated 2006-2009 incursion.– Ethiopia is to this day training and arming the different faction of Somali clans, while   Eritrea is armed and trained Alshabab.

Once again  Ethiopian dictator declared that his  troops would only be deployed for a brief period to fight Alshabab  militants.  Later is  also  affronting 11,000 strong African Union  (AMISOM) forces  and Kenyans  fighting to controlled the Azania corner oil rich  Juba land as a “buffer zone”. .

This new 180 degree turn of the  Ethiopian dictator  stopping his sudden evacuation was justified in the following propaganda :-

“It (Ethiopia) will remain (in Somalia) until the Transitional Government (of Somalia) has adequately organized itself to fend off any attack from hostile forces,”  “There is no current plan to evacuate from Somalia until such time that a proper Somali constitution is ratified by all parties to the conflict, and until the constituent assembly will ratify the constitution,”

The new million dollars of US aid recently granted may be forced him to stay since he got a new indirectly mandate.

Last June Somalia’s feuding leaders agreed to extend the mandate of a transitional government for a year rather than hold elections, a move sought by Uganda which has peacekeepers stationed in the anarchic state.

The mandate for Somalia’s latest administration was meant to expire in August 2011 but President Sheikh Sharif Ahmed, a former Islamist rebel leader, and speaker Sharif Hassan Sheikh Aden, who covets the top job, had been at loggerheads over what should happen then, and agreed to defer elections.

Alshabab seems strategically  have surrendered territory in Mogadishu and across central and southern Somalia in the past few months weekend by AMISON forces where the Eritrean support is no more reaching crippled with sanction of 2008 and December 2011

AU and Somali government troops seem to secure little aid corridor between Mogadishu and a former rebel stronghold close to the capital. By the end of the month, Somali and Kenyan forces had captured the rebel stronghold and strategic town of Afmadow; but never able to capture the capital of Alshabab Kismayu.

Seizing Afmadow was considered a crucial step in the Kenyan drive towards the southern port city of Kismayu, the hub of al Shabab operations, about 120 km (75 miles) away.

Alshabab in areas they have vacated they are launching grenade attacks and using suicide bombers. The rebel group has waged a bloody five-year campaign to topple Somalia’s Western-backed government and impose its harsh interpretation of Islamic law with the support of Eritrea.

It continues to hold swathes of central and southern Somalia with help of Eritrea only against 11’000 AMISON Forces with Kenya and Ethiopia included.

Mandera the war for Somalian repartition between Ethiopia and Kenya

The recent armed clash between Ethiopian, Kenyan and Somali resistance fighters in the regional strategically city of Mandera has rekindled the long waited regional war of the horn Africa. It is a Somali city located at the cross road between the three countries:  Somalia, Ethiopia and Kenya. Mandera was a central meeting point for all   Ogadeans before the Scramble for Africa in 1880’s that divide them with artificial boarders. This the time bomb set by colonial powers that  divided  people of the region by artificial imaginary lines, thus separating  families of the same clan.


When we talk about the Ogaden region of Ethiopia we have tenancy to forget the name Ogaden given to the region is a tribal name inside Somali populated region of Ethiopia. Today the whole region is named Somali region by the Ethiopian dictator Melese Zenawie since 1991.  This is conspiracy against the Somalis by creating a condition similar to Balkans, where there is a country Macedonia and a region with the same name inside Greek. While there is already country called Somalia there is need to create another Somalia. The main purpose to name such ethnical region is to accelerate the dismemberment of Somalia itself.  Another point to be raised it is not only in Ethiopia that Ogaden exists, but also in Kenya- the western Somali populated region of Kenya is also inhabited with same tribes of Ogadeni.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

[stream provider=youtube flv=http%3A//www.youtube.com/watch%3Fv%3DpZa9LoV6qWo img=x:/img.youtube.com/vi/pZa9LoV6qWo/0.jpg embed=false share=false width=340 height=260 dock=true controlbar=over bandwidth=high autostart=false /]

[stream provider=youtube flv=http%3A//www.youtube.com/watch%3Fv%3DtQW6tSU7h2g img=x:/img.youtube.com/vi/tQW6tSU7h2g/0.jpg embed=false share=false width=340 height=260 dock=true controlbar=over bandwidth=high autostart=false /]

On the 24th of February the Ethiopian mechanized forces supporting the newly trained Somali mercenaries are fighting the Somali insurgents not far from the border town of Mandera supported with heavy weapons.  Melese Zenawie government has been involvement in Somali internal affairs since his accession to power in Ethiopia. He had officially started in its invasion of Somali in 2006 which he left after shameful defeat replacing himself with Burundi and Ugandan troops with the umbrella of the African Unity peace keepers. Both countries running UN resolved eternal ethnic rivalry and armed insurgency in their own land.   The Melese Zenawie mercenary troops have just been caught in Tripoli and Bengasi supporting the falling killer of Libya and Cyrenaica, Mohammed Gaddafi.

[stream provider=youtube flv=http%3A//www.youtube.com/watch%3Fv%3DfOamz0GR4ww img=x:/img.youtube.com/vi/fOamz0GR4ww/0.jpg embed=false share=false width=340 height=260 dock=true controlbar=over bandwidth=high autostart=false /]

—————

[stream provider=youtube flv=http%3A//www.youtube.com/watch%3Fv%3De9tjGyPyzIs img=x:/img.youtube.com/vi/e9tjGyPyzIs/0.jpg embed=false share=false width=340 height=260 dock=true controlbar=over bandwidth=high autostart=false /]

[stream provider=youtube flv=http%3A//www.youtube.com/watch%3Fv%3DfBtNVUl5meo img=x:/img.youtube.com/vi/fBtNVUl5meo/0.jpg embed=false share=false width=340 height=260 dock=true controlbar=over bandwidth=high autostart=false /]

The Ethiopian troops are firing missiles to ensure the newly trained Somali mercenary troops are successfully deployed in Somalia to destabilize the already fragile   country in the name of fighting “Islam extremism.” It is just a pretext to keep himself in power like Hosni Mubarak of Egypt and Ben Ali of Tunisia. Melese Zenawie is trying to divert the world attention to the newly open conflict on the cross road city of Mandera.

The Ethiopian dictatorial regime of Melese Zenawie has been training 2,000 Somali mercenaries since late 2009 to accomplish the unfinished job of Balkanizing Somalia to different factions. Melese has agreed to let Juba land to pass in the hands of Kenya, while unsuccessfully attempted to control Mogadishu. Since the fall of the central state of Somalia in 1989, Somaliland and Putland have already defacto declared their independence.

The border fighting for the reparation of Somalia between Kenya and Ethiopia has spilled over to the Kenyan town of Mender last Thursday. The tension was high in Mandera County since Wednesday morning as fears of spill-over of the fighting grip residents of Mandera town.

The fist bomb exploded at the Mandera District hospital on Thursday as heavy fighting continued between the different faction to control the border key town between Somalia rebels fighting against Ethiopian troops and their mercenaries with the support of Kenya fighting to control her Ogadeni region of Western territories. Local reporters have seen wounded Kenyans are rushed to be treated for bullet wounds while the authorities are denying their involvement in the conflict to control Somalia.

Kenya has increased its contingent by moving an army battalion around Mandera Town.

The conflict has reached the Kenyan border towns stretching to Kilima Fisi up to Hulugo Somalia Juba land crossing point near Lamu. These are the intersectional crossing to between the three borderline countries.

Beside the regular army Kenya just deployed security team comprising Kenya Army’s Rangers and Special Forces detachments, as well as the General Service Unit and Administration Police.

Two severely and four other Kenyan soldiers were also wounded.  While Kenya like Ethiopia has trained its Somalis mercenaries, it won’t be long before the conflict spill over to Kenyan Somali region like Ogaden of Ethiopia.

 

According to the Kenyan minimizing news media:-

“One woman has been reported dead at Border Point One and 10 casualties are being treated at Mandera District Hospital,” Kenya Red Cross Secretary General Abbas Gullet said in a statement.

He said the fighting that started at about 10am on Friday did not spare the Red Cross offices where several gun shots were fired, but no casualty was reported.

“Several gunshots flying in the air across the border have hit the Kenya Red Cross Society (KRCS) offices in Mandera, where six members of staff are holed up, like many other residents of Mandera town,” Mr Gullet said.

“The gunshots have rocked the town, keeping residents and refugees indoors,” he said.

The Society’s Spokesman Titus Mung’ou said the situation had put the lives of humanitarian workers and other residents of Mandera town in grave danger.

“We have reported this latest incident to the Government and hope the KRCS offices, which have a Red Cross emblem flag hoisted on the rooftop, will be protected,” he said.

The Red Cross emblem is a protected symbol, under the Geneva Conventions, and all warring parties are required to respect it, he added.

“Hundreds of refugees are now scattered on the Kenyan side of the border, as it is risky to gather in camps until fighting ceases,” he said.

Hundreds of families began fleeing Mandera town Friday following the intense fighting that has been going on at the Kenya-Somalia border since Wednesday.

Reports from Mandera indicate that schools, government offices and hospitals had been shut for stray ammunition that has been hammering the border town.

A councilor who spoke to Capital News from Mandera said although no physical attacks had occurred in the town, residents were worried of the bullets that “are being fired from various directions whenever the troops are fighting the militiamen.”

On Thursday morning, eight people were struck by bullets fired by militia men who have been fighting AU troops on the Somalia side.

“It is scaring, you cannot know when a bullet will land near you and that is why people are running for safety,” the councilor who only identified himself as Ahmed said.

“Some houses have gone up in flames since morning and we don’t know who are burning them but we highly suspect it has something to do with what is going on at the border,” Ahmed added.

He said Mandera town remained deserted for the better part of Friday and only military and police trucks were seen parked strategically with heavily armed officers.

“People are running towards remote areas far away from Mandera, we don’t want to become victims,” he added “This place now is inhabitable, there are heavy gunfire renting the air every after a couple of hours.

The situation was made worse when a bomb was hurled at the Mandera district hospital but no one was hurt because it landed on an open field.

North Eastern Provincial Commissioner Joseph ole Serian told Capital News that the bomb could have caused a major disaster “were it not that it landed on an open field.”

“The hospital covers a large area, we are lucky it landed on an open ground, it could have been disastrous,” ole Serian said on telephone from where he was coordinating security.

Some 14 African Union soldiers flown from Mogadishu were still admitted to hospitals in Mombasa where they have been receiving treatment for bullet wounds since Thursday.

Military Spokesman Bogita Ongeri told Capital News they had enhanced security at the border towns to stop  Al-Shabaab fighters from liberating from controlling western Kenya.

————–

[stream provider=youtube flv=http%3A//www.youtube.com/watch%3Fv%3DFTmU3tRf9yw img=x:/img.youtube.com/vi/FTmU3tRf9yw/0.jpg embed=false share=false width=340 height=260 dock=true controlbar=over bandwidth=high autostart=false /]

———————–

 

The Kenyan soldiers fought the Somali resistance fighters who had tried to stop them from controlling the Somali region of Kenya seven were injured.

The best and the lasting solution for the region is  non ignorance in the internal affair of Somalis by the different  neighboring counties  like Ethiopia and Kenya in order not further  radicalize the situation.

The strategic city of Mandera would be the Waterloo of Melese Zenawie and the Kenyan election killers who are trying to divert the internal situation to this undue conflict by calling for   intervention the  embattled western  forces  in Iraq and Afghanistan.

[stream provider=youtube flv=http%3A//www.youtube.com/watch%3Fv%3DJLk0HJTziaI img=x:/img.youtube.com/vi/JLk0HJTziaI/0.jpg embed=false share=false width=340 height=260 dock=true controlbar=over bandwidth=high autostart=false /]

[stream provider=youtube flv=http%3A//www.youtube.com/watch%3Fv%3DG2e8MWaWt4Q img=x:/img.youtube.com/vi/G2e8MWaWt4Q/0.jpg embed=false share=false width=340 height=260 dock=true controlbar=over bandwidth=highautostart=false /]

[stream provider=youtube flv=http%3A//www.youtube.com/watch%3Fv%3D_suf0Sd1a60 img=x:/img.youtube.com/vi/_suf0Sd1a60/0.jpg embed=false share=false width=340 height=260 dock=true controlbar=over bandwidth=high autostart=false /]

Related Post

Melese’s plan for Kenya and Ethiopia ought to annex and divide Somalia …

Somalia TGS’ rift Al Shabab’s domino

Somalia the Kurdistan of Africa was known as Puntland prehistorically by the ancient Egypt.  Since the Scramble of Africa the Somalis have gone through war and unprecedented conflict.   The Somalis are found today in Kenya, Ethiopia, Djibouti, Puntland, Somaliland and Somalia.

In the post colonial period the Somalis have been victim of extremism and continue foreign intervention: – the US in 94/95, Ethiopia 2006, and recently they become the center of conflict piracy and instability in the horn of Africa. Most importantly they have been the battle ground for Eritrean and Ethiopian Proxy wars which engulfed the countries of the Great Lakes Uganda and Burundi under sponsored by AU.   A transitional Government has been established under the auspices of the AU and the UN.

The recent rift between the two top leader of the embattled Somalia is about to collapse mostly from the weakness and the    ambivalent   engagement of the AU troops.

The Transitional government of Somali is highly weakened by three principal factures namely:-

Firstly  the  clan politics installed in the colonial past   inside  Somalia,  and  the recent TGS which by the rift between the two rivals in power- Sharif Ahmed, President and   the Premier Sharmarke;

Secondly by a Strong Al Shabab & the Militias advancement supported by the countries of the Red Se cost;

Thirdly by non commitment of the AU member countries to give unconditional support to TGS, and those engaged are half heartedly employed as means to boom the position of the supporting countries strong men’s international stand rather than resolving the Somalian Question Definitively.

All these factors are working indirectly for Al Shabab’s advancement.  The continuous polemic between the two will collapse the AU supported TGS if not resolved internally. TGS could not be able   to control outside the   President’s office residence and the Air port which was targeted by the suicide bombers of Al Shabab few days earlier. The Resent Al Shabab’s   bomb blast at Muna Hotel killed some member of TGS parliament sending shock waves to the AMSOM troops lamenting in Mogadishu. The recent Al-Shabab attack   forced the Ugandan president to send additional troops to help the government in its last battle against Al-Shabab.

The 6000 strong AU peace keeping force did not succeed to subdue the supposedly Al Qaida supported Somalian street fighters. They are indirectly supported by the government of the Red Sea costs who opposes the Ethiopian and AU supported TGS forces on the ground.   Red Sea governments like Yemen, Eritrea and Egypt opposes the definitive secession Somaliland. The newly elected Islamic Unity party is highly advised to take over Mogadishu by these governments which see their interest compromised.  The newly independent Somaliland on the Cost of the Red sea serving as an Ethiopian out let than that of the Traditional Djibouti and Eritrea will weaken their economic and geostrategic interest in long term if the port of Barbara becomes the principal port in the Indian Ocean for the Ethiopian and the newly independent Southern Sudan outlet.

The continues division between the two top leaders  will precipitate the  end of the TGS as we know it,  and will be bring a new change breaking the status quo. The TGS Premier seemingly has assured the support of the Parliament and some countries around the region against President Sharif.

Somalia’s prime minister resigns amid tensions

Get the Flash Player to see the wordTube Media Player.
Get the Flash Player to see the wordTube Media Player.

UN wants transitional government to end squabbling as it warns about insurgents becoming a serious security threat.

The UN says the al-Shabab group is increasingly posing a serious international security threat [Reuters] 14 Sep 2010

The United Nations has warned that Somalia insurgents are posing a serious international security threat and made a renewed appeal to the transitional government to end the civil conflict.

The rise of the al-Shabaab movement has raised concerns among western governments, in addition to the pirates operating out of Somalia ports.

Somalia will be in the spotlight during a debate at the Security Council on Thursday and a top level ministerial meeting on the conflict at the UN General Assembly summit next week.

Ban Ki-moon, the UN secretary-general, said “horrific” suicide bomb attacks by al-Shabaab followers in Uganda in July had shown the growing threat from the al-Qaeda inspired group.

Some 76 people were killed in that attack.

‘Security threat’

“The attacks demonstrated that al-Shabaab remains a serious security threat for Somalia, the sub-region and the wider international community,” Ban said in a report to the Security Council on Monday.

The UN report said the Somali capital’s “already weak health services are struggling to cope with casualties”, citing thousands of reported deaths in Mogadishu this year.

A special envoy for Ban, Augustine Mahiga, an African Union envoy, Boubacar Diarra, and an East African peace envoy, Kipruto Arap Kirwa, were at Mogadishu airport on Thursday to meet Sharif Sheikh Ahmed, the head of the transitional government, when a suicide bomber killed five people there.

The three envoys said on Monday the government is in disarray and warned that the divisions were “potentially very damaging” to efforts to end the chaos.

The transitional government is scheduled to end in August 2011, and analysts say it has achieved little so far.

Political battles

Repeated political battles in recent months have seen the president dissolve the cabinet and the parliament speaker resign.

“Somali forces and [AMISOM troops] risk their lives each day to protect the transitional federation institutions and defend the integrity of the peace process,” the three envoys said in a statement released in Nairobi.

“The leaders and politicians need to demonstrate their unity of purpose to show they are working together to restore peace to Somalia.”

Ban sent a similar message highlighting international efforts to promote peace in spite of the “internal disputes” and “political complications”.

The UN chief said the international financial crisis has hit efforts to boost the African peacekeeping force.

“I remind all parties to the conflict that those found responsible for war crimes will face justice,” Ban said.

“In that regard I support the proposal to document the most serious violations committed, as an essential step in the fight against impunity.”

Related

Rift threatens Somali government

Somalia airport comes under attack

Caught between arms and politics