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Zenawie loses his sense

Islamic Revolt 2012 “Social Insurgency vs Sectarianism” ? the Case of Ethiopia

Islam in Ethiopia is known since the time of the Prophet.
The first Hijrah was in Ethiopia at the order of the Mohammed the founder of Islam.

Since the Arab Spring of 2011 Ethiopia tested its share reaching climax in 2012.
This video shows the different positions of the Ethiopian Islamist and the different manifestations those anti and pro as the situation start being exploited by the regime which is leading to more exacerbation and more clamp down with no solution.

The revolt would lead to general uprising and regime change, if it is not kidnapped by sectarians and only if the other sector of the society joins the insurgency.

First African dictator to be condemned by ICC Charles Taller paved the way for the African dictators like Issias Afewerki, Melese Zenawie etc…

Charles Taller the First African dictator to be condemned by ICC paved the way for the  African dictators like  Issias Afewerki, Melese Zenawie  etc…

 

Charles Taylor (1990)

Eritrean president Isaias Afwerki in joint press briefing in Asmara, December, 10, 2002. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Former President of Liberia 1997-2003 is “criminally responsible” to provide weapons, in exchange for diamonds, the rebel Revolutionary United Front (RUF) in Sierra Leone, killing dozens of mutilated and enslaved thousands of people, according to the Special Court for Sierra Leone (SCSL). In the horn of Africa Isaias Afwerki have prepared and trained the undefeated Alshabab with over 11’000 AMISON solider to this day and is training thousands to this day to destabilize the region and Somalia since 1991.

Taller ex-guerrillas and ex-con in the United States, was born 29th Taylor January 1948 at Arthington, 25 kilometers northeast of the Liberian capital of Monrovia in a family of fifteen brothers.

After studying economics at Boston University (USA), returned to Liberia in April 1980 after the military coup, to join the government of Samuel Doe, who was to manage procurement.

But the charge did not last long because in 1983 he was the embezzlement of over a million dollars to an account in the U.S., after he fled to this country accused, where he was arrested and sent to prison, but in 1985 he escaped from prison along with four other prisoners saw the bars of a disused laundry.

English: Muammar Qaddafi, the Libyan chief of ...

In is exile in Libya , the protection of Muammar al-Qaddafi decided enjoyed, and later in the Ivory Coast, where he founded the National Patriotic Forces of Liberia (NPFL) like that  of Isaias Afwerki  and Melese Zenawie supported and financed by dead Libyan dictator while in struggle. He even declared in his parliaments in 1991” Melese is converted in Libya to get the money.”

24th December 1989, more than four years after escaping from prison in the U.S., Taylor in the Ivorian city of Nimbi on the Liberian border again, at the top of the NPFL and came with his troops to Liberia in an attempt to Doe, who eventually assassinated in September 1990, to overthrow.

 Charles had an impact on the civil war in Liberia (1990-1995), with thousands dead and nearly a million refugees.

He was involved after the intervention of the United Nations and the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS), the various factions in the conflict, in Abuja (Nigeria) signed a peace agreement on 20 August 1995, was created by the body, transition ruled the country until the elections in July 1997.

Taylor, in his new group, the National Patriotic Party won (PNP) , the election with 75.32 percent of the vote, despite his campaign slogan “He killed my mother, My father was killed, but you will agree. ”

According to experts from the African country, why the Presidency of Liberia, Taylor has been so strong campaign of terror and anguish of the people to start a new civil war, when he defeated was.

During his tenure, Taylor provided arms to the rebels of the Revolutionary United Front (RUF) in Sierra Leone, one of the stakeholder groups from the civil war in this country that has killed and maimed tens of thousands of enslaved people and to exploit than the diamond mines of the country. In parallel the the horn of  African student of Mohammed Kaddafi Isasias Afwerki with hundreds of training camps to destabilize the region not realy helping them for the liberation of their country but as a proxy by it own ends are working thousands to work in the farm and the new find gold mines.

In return, Taylor received RUF these gems , the so-called “blood diamonds”  while Isaias helps him to get a continues  support by the Mediterranean dead dictator of Libya .

In May 2001 the UN imposed sanctions on Liberia, and two years later, in June 2003 accused the Special Court in Sierra Leone, founded in 1996 and supported by the United Nations, against Taylor for war crimes and crimes humanity. The same was with Eritrea two sanctioned one in 2006 and 2011 nothing changes to this day.

For Taller in 1 August approved in 2003 by the UN to send a multinational peacekeeping force in the country and the day after Taylor resigned, after which they began their exile in Calabar announced (Nigeria).

29th March 2006 Taller  was arrested while trying to flee Nigeria, knowing that the Nigerian government had accepted his deportation and extradition to the Liberian authorities.

On the same day  rasladado in Freetown (Sierra Leone) was where he caught , and soon afterwards the Dutch government agreed that the trial was held in The Hague while the United Kingdom agreed that Taylor to serve his sentence in one of its prisons.

20th June 2006, Taylor came to The Hague court on eleven counts of war crimes and crimes against humanity, including murder and mutilation of civilians, with women and girls as sex slaves and forced recruitment of children and adults in exchange for smuggling. The Eritrean deadly dictator also forces children to become his proxy fighters form Tigerian region of Ethiopia.

The process began in June 2007 and he said more than 110 witnesses, including the model Naomi Campbell, whose dictator was “blood diamonds” have to.

In March 2011, was negotiating for the test seen and after more than a year of deliberations, the Special Court for Sierra Leone on 26 April convicted and announced the sentence today.

 

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Africa Land of Dictators waiting for Social tsunami

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Following the Social Tsunami in the Arab World, it is a high time the continent of Africa to get rid of its dictators and join the democratic world. Recently Associated Press dressed a list of African remaining “Big Men” – the leaders who refuse to surrender power, and their sons. We have added the Algerian dictator to the list and made the images to complete the work.

 

Teodoro Obiang Nguema of Equatorial Guinea, 69 – Took power in a bloody coup in 1979.

Jose Eduardo dos Santos of Angola, 68 – President since 1979. Promised elections from 2006 until last year, when a new constitution abolished presidential balloting. The leader of the party that wins most parliament seats becomes president.

Denis Sassou-Nguesso of Republic of Congo, 67 – President from 1979 until a 1992 election defeat, seized power again in 1997 with help from Angolan troops.

Robert Mugabe of Zimbabwe, 87 – Elected 1980 after a seven-year war for black rule. Refused to accept a 2008 election defeat and is pushing to end a shaky unity government coalition.

Paul Biya of Cameroon, 77 – President since 1982. Has won questionable elections since 1992. Changed constitution so he can run again this year.

Yoweri Museveni of Uganda, about 66 – President since 1986 when he took power as a rebel leader and ended a civil war. Refused to hold elections until 1996. Most recently reelected March 9 in elections opposition claims were rigged.

King Mswati III of Swaziland, 42 – Succeeded his father in 1986. The last absolute monarch in the world.

Blaise Compaore of Burkina Faso, 60 – Took power from his best friend, assassinated in the 1987 palace coup. Changed the constitution limiting presidential terms. Holds elections whose results are disputed by a fragmented msg opposition.

Omar al-Bashir of Sudan, 67 – Led a bloodless coup in 1989. First sitting head of state indicted by the International Criminal Court, for war crimes and crimes against humanity in Darfur.

Idriss Deby of Chad, 59 or 60 – Seized power in a 1990 coup. Eliminated constitutional term limits to contest questionable elections. Faces voters in April.

Meles Zenawi of Ethiopia, 55 – Part of a rebel group that ended a civil war in 1991. Elected in 1995. Has held questionable elections marred by riots and bloodshed.

Isaias Afwerki of Eritrea, 65 – Led the Eritrean rebel movement that helped end Ethiopia’s civil war in 1991 and ushered in Eritrea’s independence, with him as president, in 1993. Says he expects to live another 40 to 50 years and Eritrea may hold elections in 30 or 40 years.

Paul Kagame of Rwanda, 53 – Led rebels who ended Rwanda’s genocide in 1994. Elected since 2000 in elections from which all meaningful opponents have been barred.

Yahya Jammeh of Gambia, 45 – Took power in a 1994 coup and vows to never leave. Tribal chieftains are campaigning to make him king.

Ismail Omar Guelleh of Djibouti, 67 – Elected 1999 to continue a 30-year family dynasty. Changed constitution so he can run for a third term in April.

Faure Gnassingbe of Togo, 44 – Won disputed 2005 elections to succeed his father, who ruled for 38 years.

Ali Bongo of Gabon, 52 – Won 2009 elections amid charges of vote-rigging and violent protests after the death of his father, who had ruled since 1967.

Laurent Gbagbo of Ivory Coast, 65 – Assumed office in 2000 after elections barring leading opponents. Lost 2010 elections but refuses to step down.

Abdelaziz Bouteflika, 74 President of Algeria. He has been in office since 1999. He has continued emergency rule and presided over the end of the bloody Algerian Civil War in 2002

The fall of hard Dictator Mubarak announces end all dictators- 2011-2012

2011/2012 the year  the earth is changing  & cleansing  itself while the inhabitants of the planet due to the high rate of the catastrophe are no more linnet to support the incapable tyrant   who reign over them and use the international aid for their personal ends.  The global catastrophes are announcing the end of the dictators around the world. The Tunisia and Egyptian revolt is the being of the end of all dictators.

The Egyptian showed to the world how they will defeat the most outrageous dictator in Africa Hosni Mubarak.  Egyptian resistance is harsher than that of the Tunisia. The coming fight against the African dictators of the Horn of African will be bloody unless their sponsor forces them to relinquished power by depriving them their blind support.

In his last days, the Egyptian dictator ordered his security police to attack the protestors dressed in civil cloths after disarming the protestors?  The security van dashed through civilian protestors and passed crushing itself through. The Egypt police van video is just another example of violence in Egypt. Several journalists have been attacked in the streets of Cairo.

Get the Flash Player to see the wordTube Media Player.

Despite the chaos, another massive Cairo protest in planned for today Friday, February 4.
The Mubarak ordered the soldiers to shoot on site and at the same time ordered his puppet newly handpicked Prime minster   to excuse for the death of the protestors the last three days.  The  dictator  of the Arabian nights  claimed his 62 years service  at the same time forgetting  Egyptian are beating  and crashed by his security forces in the disguise of  his supports.

Thursday Gunfire erupted in downtown Cairo again Thursday afternoon when anti-government protesters broke out of their barricades on the edge of Tahrir Square. It was the second day of violent clashes between the insurgents and s the security forces disguised as supporters of Egyptian deadly dictator Hosni Mubarak.

Soldiers fired over the protestors’ heads   though they were told to shoot by the dictator in his last days attempt to push them back.  Mubarak’s security forces disguised as his supporters in civil cloths and anti government protestors are well aware that the army has pledged not to use force, rendering the small number of soldiers on the ground ineffectual, reduced at times to trying to wave them away.

The army had attempted to keep the two sides far enough apart so their stone-throwing would be ineffective — planting tanks and soldiers in the no-man’s land of what had become enemy lines — but the protesters’ shift out of Tahrir Square onto open ground near the Nile River greatly complicated the soldiers’ task.

Yom Jumaa  a  potentially larger confrontation loomed Friday, the main prayer day of the Muslim week, when protest organizers have called for a redoubling of efforts to force Mubarak to step aside though he told  reports that he will resign as soon as transitional  regime is set in order to stop  coming  chaos .

His western allies knowing that they will not save their protégée from the Social Tsunami  demanded a swift political transition, the newly appointed  puppet prime minister, Ahmed Shafiq, called the storming of the square on Wednesday by pro-Mubarak partisans a “fatal error” and pledged to investigate who had masterminded it, knowing his master the dying dictator Mubarak did it.

On Wednesday the dictator order an onslaught, which left at least dozen people dead and hundreds injured, produced surreal scenes, most notably a horse-and-camel charge by the attackers like the olden war in time of the great Egyptian leader Mohamed Ali. The two sides battled for hours with crude weapons, protestors used – sticks, stones, bottles, cudgels — while the dictator’s security men in civil dress used gunfire and firebombs aimed at the square’s defenders of liberty.

As always the dictator regime has denied fomenting the violence and distanced itself from the storming of the square. But organizers of what had heretofore been peaceful protesters in the square say the assailants — who staged wave after wave of well-coordinated attacks — were acting at the behest of the 82-year-old Egyptian leader and that their ranks included plainclothes police and criminals sprung from jail for that purpose.

Finally on Thursday, unlike the previous day, those disguised as the supports of President Hosni Mubarak, the armed security men were outnumbered. They were also extremely angry, taking out their ire on Western journalists who they see as misrepresenting them as the cause of the continuing violence.

In the afternoon of Thursday, the principal flashpoint remained a contested stretch near the world-famous Egyptian Museum, which abuts Liberation Square. Pro-Mubarak f security forces roamed freely in other downtown areas. Losing ground the security of men was seen confiscating food and water apparently meant for the square’s defenders.

The pro democracy forces captured and detained dozens of pro-Mubarak security attackers, placing them in a makeshift holding area before periodically handing them over to the army, rendering rough justice was sometimes dispensed on the spot for suspected  bought killers of the Dictators

The disguised security forces of Mubarak were attacking foreigners, and foreign journalists in particular, were menaced.  The insurgents took over the city of Cairo, Alexandria and Sinai and set up impromptu checkpoints, pedestrians and motorists were ordered to produce identification _ a token of the vigilante system that has taken hold across Egypt.

In incongruous scenes, some protesters in the square prostrated themselves in prayer while a hail of rocks fell nearby. On the square’s fringes, men smashed railings to make metal clubs. Some people wore motorcycle helmets, or swaddled their heads in blankets.
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The army had attempted to keep the two sides far enough apart so their stone-throwing would be ineffective — planting tanks and soldiers in the no-man’s land of what had become enemy lines — but the protesters’ shift out of Tahrir Square onto open ground near the Nile River greatly complicated the soldiers’ task.

Yom Jumaa  a  potentially larger confrontation loomed Friday, the main prayer day of the Muslim week, when protest organizers have called for a redoubling of efforts to force Mubarak to step aside though he told  reports that he will resign as soon as transitional  regime is set in order to stop  coming  chaos .

His western allies knowing that they will not save their protégée from the Social Tsunami  demanded a swift political transition, the newly appointed  puppet prime minister, Ahmed Shafiq, called the storming of the square on Wednesday by pro-Mubarak partisans a “fatal error” and pledged to investigate who had masterminded it, knowing his master the dying dictator Mubarak did it.

On Wednesday the dictator order an onslaught, which left at least five people dead and hundreds injured, produced surreal scenes, most notably a horse-and-camel charge by the attackers like the olden war in time of the great Egyptian leader Mohamed Ali. The two sides battled for hours with crude weapons , protestors used – sticks, stones, bottles, cudgels —  while  the dictators security men in civil used to gunfire and firebombs aimed at the square’s defenders of liberty.

As always the dictator regime has denied fomenting the violence and distanced itself from the storming of the square. But organizers of what had heretofore been peaceful protesters in the square say the assailants — who staged wave after wave of well-coordinated attacks — were acting at the behest of the 82-year-old Egyptian leader and that their ranks included plainclothes police and criminals sprung from jail for that purpose.

Finally on Thursday, unlike the previous day, those disguised as the supports of President Hosni Mubarak, the armed security men were outnumbered. They were also extremely angry, taking out their ire on Western journalists who they see as misrepresenting them as the cause of the continuing violence.

In the afternoon of Thursday, the principal flashpoint remained a contested stretch near the world-famous Egyptian Museum, which abuts Tahrir (Liberation) Square. Pro-Mubarak f security forces roamed freely in other downtown areas. Losing ground the security of men was seen confiscating food and water apparently meant for the square’s defenders.

The pro democracy forces captured and detained dozens of pro-Mubarak security attackers, placing them in a makeshift holding area before periodically handing them over to the army, rendering rough justice was sometimes dispensed on the spot for suspected killers.

The disguised security forces of Mubarak were attacking foreigners, and foreign journalists in particular, were menaced.  The insurgents took over the city of Cairo, Alexandria and Sinai and set up impromptu checkpoints, pedestrians and motorists were ordered to produce identification _ a token of the vigilante system that has taken hold across Egypt.

In incongruous scenes, some protesters in the square prostrated themselves in prayer while a hail of rocks fell nearby. On the square’s fringes, men smashed railings to make metal clubs. Some people wore motorcycle helmets, or swaddled their heads in blankets.

Dictator Melese Zenawie loses his sense and criticizes US legitimate defense to September 11 terrorist act :- Melese graps mistakes rather than learn from them :- Genocide from Rewanda Guantanamo from US

2009 Human Rights Reports: Ethiopia

2009 Country Reports on Human Rights Practices
March 11, 2010

Ethiopia blasts US for report on rights record

Sudan Tribune: Ethiopia blasts US for report on rights record28March 2010


Ethiopia Denounces US State Department Report

March 27, 2010 — The Ethiopian government denounced the 2009 US State Department Human Rights Report on Ethiopia, according to ENA. The government says it was compiled in collaboration with Neo-liberal extremist forces and it is groundless and unacceptable.

In a press statement it issued on Friday the government said it exhaustively examined the 2009 US State Department Human Rights Report with the previous report issued by same department.

“76 percent of 2009 report is a carbon copy of 2008 similar report while 21 percent of it is slightly modified newly fabricated allegations. Some 14 percent of the report is seemingly new issues.”

The funny side of the report is naming the Oromo National Liberation Front (ONLF) members who killed 65 Ethiopians and eight Chinese innocent civilians at Ogaden area as political prisoners.

“In paradox, the US government has not named as political prisoners the suspects who engaged in the terrorist attack on Sept. 11 detained at Guantanamo without due court process.”

httpvhd://www.youtube.com/watch?v=odnnYdztdto

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“The Office said the ill-fated report consciously narrated that members of Ginbot 7 terrorist group were stayed long in prison with out charging file by court and as if they were deprived of family visits. ”

“The report even did not try the very elementary step to verify the hearsays and allegations from the Ethiopian government rather incorporated information from terrorist sects like ONLF, Oromo Liberation Front (OLF) and Ginbot 7 Group.”
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Source: ENA

Stable Ethiopia now needs international and local support

Published Date: 29 March 2010
By Charles Tannock

TWO decades ago, Ethiopia was a Cold War battlefield. On the ideological map of the world, it was Soviet territory, a land of famine, dictatorship and civil war. But, with the overthrow of Mengistu Haile Mariam’s Marxist-Leninist dictatorship in 1991, Ethiopia began to transform itself. Today, it ranks among the five fastest-growing economies in the world and is a bastion of regional stability.

That stability matters, because the Horn of Africa is becoming a security headache once again. If the region is to be stabilised, Ethiopia will need to play a key part.

Besides the never-ending anarchy of neighbouring Somalia, the regional challenges facing Ethiopia and its long-serving prime minister, Meles Zenawi, are daunting. The country remains on a war footing with Eritrea over the disputed border village of Badme. The peace deal between the government and the former rebel SPLM is unravelling fast in neighbouring Sudan, where a scheduled referendum in the south in January 2011 on secession and independence – part of the 2005 peace deal – may provoke a return to all-out war.

Further south, Kenya remains scarred by the aftermath of post-election violence, and its constitutional review process could lead to yet more bloodshed. Moreover, Ethiopia’s proximity to strife-torn Yemen just across the Red Sea is complicating the country’s foreign policy because of its role in working to keep Somalia out of Islamist control.

Despite these myriad problems – or perhaps because of them – Ethiopia has an opportunity to emerge as the undisputed regional leader. Though landlocked, Ethiopia is comparatively well endowed with natural resources, not least its fertile farmland. A final settlement of the lengthy dispute with Egypt over the waters of the Blue Nile appears to be in sight, and could have a powerful impact on economic growth.

But, despite Ethiopia’s progress, the international community has been reluctant to view the country as a strategic partner. Of course, Ethiopia has its problems, but these should be seen in an African context. The human-rights situation could undoubtedly be improved – in particular, the treatment of the political opposition leader Birtukan Mideksa – but Isaias Afwerki’s regime in Eritrea is far worse.

President Yoweri Museveni of Uganda has created what amounts to a one-party state during his 24 years in power, yet he is feted in the West as one of Africa’s visionary leaders.

If Zenawi consolidates his hold on power in the parliamentary elections due this May, the world should expect the stability that he has brought to take deeper root. Whether it will ripple throughout the region is another question. That is why, regardless of the electoral result, Ethiopia needs international backing.

It is interesting to contrast the likely consequences of the election in Ethiopia with the expected fallout from the presidential election scheduled in Sudan at around the same time. If Omar al-Bashir retains Sudan’s presidency, as expected, he will be emboldened to step up his hostility to the country’s restless regions. His bloody campaign in Darfur, the world should need no reminding, has led to his indictment by the International Criminal Court.

Bashir will also no doubt try to stop the oil-rich devolved region of South Sudan from declaring independence. The people of South Sudan are likely to favour secession – not least because of decades of war and the deeply resented imposition of Sharia law by Bashir’s government.

Many now believe that Bashir will seek to prevent the referendum from taking place, or to use its result as a pretext to return to war with the south – with devastating consequences across the Horn of Africa. Ethiopia’s diplomacy will be vital to minimising the potential for such violence to spread, but Ethiopia can fulfil this role only if it receives strong strategic backing from the West.

Regional rivalries and past history mean that Ethiopia has few natural allies in the region. One such ally could be Somaliland, the former British protectorate, which broke away from Somalia in 1991 and lies to the north-east of Ethiopia.

Somaliland is, like Ethiopia, relatively stable. It also has a lengthy coastline and a deepwater port, Berbera, which could help land-locked Ethiopia. The moderate Islam practiced in Somaliland could not be farther removed from the barbarity of the Al-Shabab in Somalia. If Ethiopia were to recognise Somaliland as sovereign, other African Union countries would probably follow – and, perhaps, the US and EU states.

Ethiopia’s leadership throughout the Horn of Africa could bring change in a part of the world that has largely been written off. It is time to give Ethiopia the diplomatic tools it needs.

• Charles Tannock is ECR foreign affairs spokesman in the European Parliament.